Create Account

Still need help

Forgotten Password

Your main account details are held by your benefits provider and as such we are unable to recover your login details. Please log in through your benefits provider site to access the Tusker online driver site.

Please enter your email address so we can email you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset request has been received. If we have an account associated with the email address provided, you will receive an email shortly.

Back to login

Create Account Help

      Thanks, we’ll work on this now for you.
      In some instances, we may need to contact your employer but we’ll aim to be back in touch within 24 hours.

    In order for us to help get you set up please can you provide the following information:

    Unfortunately we are unable to find out what your work email address or employee/payroll number is.

    If you're not sure where to find this, please contact your Human Resources or Payroll team.


    Login

    Action required

    I've read and accepted the Privacy Policy.

    CONTACT PREFERENCES

    We’d like to provide you with updates on your scheme, offers and news but to do that, we need you to update how we can contact you.

    UPDATE NOW

    How to choose an EV - 5 easy steps

    19 June 2020

    If it feels like electric motoring has turned a corner in the UK, it has. Today, you’re far more likely to hear the quiet purr of an electric motor in a car park than you were just 12 months ago. And that’s down to UK drivers who’ve done their research and decided that the time is right to go electric.

    If making the change from a fossil-fueled car to an electric vehicle (EV) seems a little daunting, read our guide to help you work out whether your next car could be electric.

    Step 1 - work out the length of your typical journey and see how many times an electric car will cover it

    One of the biggest concerns among new EV drivers is range, with worries about running out of electricity topping the list. But there’s no need to fret because most electric cars now offer over 200 miles of range. Which is enough electricity to cover the average UK driver’s daily mileage of 20 miles each day around ten times. And some EVs offer more single-charge mileage than most petrol or diesel cars.

    We suggest that you work out your typical journey distance - be that commuting, picking the kids up or dropping them off to school and activities or popping to the shops. Or set your car’s mileage trip to see how many miles you cover in a usual week.

    Then work out how often you want to have to charge - once every two weeks, once a week, once every few days. Don’t forget - you won’t need to go anywhere to charge as most drivers power their battery up overnight.

    If you intend to cover longer distances, you’ll also need to think about how far you tend to travel and how often. Is the additional expense of a bigger battery really worth it if you only plan to go beyond your single-charge range once or twice a year?

    Step 2 - know what you’re looking at when it comes to batteries

    When choosing an EV, it’s important to understand what the different metrics mean in relation to batteries. Here’s a quick run down of the key terms:

    • Li-Ion - stands for lithium ion; the most commonly used EV battery.
    • kWh - means Kilowatt hours and this figure represents:
      • The battery’s capacity - the bigger the kWh number, the further the car can typically drive without needing to be charged. However, this range will vary depending on a number of factors including car size and weight, driving conditions, temperature which will all impact how you drive will all impact energy use - exactly the same as a petrol or diesel car.
      • The speed at which the battery is charged - from slow, fast, rapid and super-rapid chargers, EV batteries can be charged as fast or as slow as you want. The slowest charge can take place overnight from a standard three-pin socket (although we and most manufacturers don’t recommend this) or a rapid charge can boost your battery to 80 in just 20 to 30 minutes. All this depends on the make and model of your car so you’ll need to check these details as part of your new car exploration.

    The average EV battery is 60kWh but cars come with much bigger and smaller sized batteries. The bigger the battery, the more miles you can cover without needing to charge. For example:

    • Smart ForFour EQ ForFour Hatch 5Dr 0.0Elec
      • 17.6kWh battery
      • 80-mile range
    • Renault Zoe Hatch 0.0Electric R110 52kWh 107 i Play Auo
      • 52kWh battery
      • 245-mile range
    • A Hyundai KONA SUV 0.0Electric 64kWh 204 Premium SE
      • 64kWh battery
      • 278-mile range

    One concern that some drivers have is the longevity of the EV’s battery. There’s no need to worry about this if you take a car through Tusker because our leases typically last three to four years. You’ll get a new car at the end of the period, well before the battery shows any real drop in terms of performance.

    Step 3 - know where you’ll charge

    A lot of people get hung up on the idea that we need rapid chargers all over the country for EVs to become credible alternatives to fossil-fueled cars. But that’s simply not the case because:

    1. 80% of EV charging takes place at home - with the vast majority of EV drivers plugging in overnight, you’ll need a charging point installed at home. A fast, 22kWh charger will charge a 60kWh battery from empty to full in eight hours and it can also give the battery a quick boost when you need it. You can add up to 100 miles of range to most EVs in around 35 minutes with a 50kWh charger.
    2. Home charging isn’t your only option - you can top-up at work or when you’re parked up while you’re carrying out other activities. Sometimes you can even charge for free - all it takes is a few seconds to plug your car in while you head off to carry on with your day, safe in the knowledge you’ll have plenty of electricity to get home.
    3. The UK’s charging network is enormous - there are now more charging points than petrol stations and they’re located everywhere, from natural beauty spots to major cities and everywhere in between. Giving you plenty of places to top up.
    4. You only really need rapid chargers for longer journeys - you’ll tend to find rapid chargers at motorway services because this is where they’re most needed. EV drivers report that they barely notice the difference in their journey time if they stop to charge their car. By pulling up and plugging in before visiting the bathroom, grabbing a coffee and stretching your legs, you’ll have a well-needed break and a charged battery that’s ready to take you a few hundred more miles.

    As with a petrol or diesel car, an EV lets you know how many miles of electricity you have left in your battery. Which gives you plenty of opportunity to stop off at a charging point, well before you run out. You can even use your in-car satnav plus online tools and apps to plan your journey with charging stops along the way.

    If you do run out of electricity, the RAC can come to your rescue. Their vans are now equipped to give your battery a boost so you can get to the next charging point. Just like being topped up with a bit of petrol by the side of the road.

    As with a petrol or diesel car, an EV lets you know how many miles of electricity you have left in your battery. Which gives you plenty of opportunity to stop off at a charging point, well before you run out. You can even use your in-car satnav plus online tools and apps to plan your journey with charging stops along the way.

    If you do run out of electricity, the RAC can come to your rescue (and don't forget Tusker cars come with RAC breakdown cover!). Their vans are now equipped to give your battery a boost so you can get to the next charging point. Just like being topped up with a bit of petrol by the side of the road.

    Step 4 - everything else you’d normally think about

    As with any car, you’ll need to take your pick from a very wide range of EVs. Which is where the usual considerations - like body style, size, boot space, number of seats and your lifestyle - come in.

    Whether you want a small city car that you can top up regularly or an estate or SUV with an enormous single-charge range, there’s an EV for you.

    Love new tech? Electric cars are like computers on wheels which can receive software updates without a trip to the garage. Giving you the latest in infotainment and a range of other tools in your existing car.

    Step 5 - find out which EV you can afford

    People will be quick to tell you that electric cars are more expensive than their fossil-fueled counterparts. However, if you're a company car driver or you’re able to take a car through a salary sacrifice scheme, it’s highly likely that you’ll be eligible to make excellent tax and NI savings (32% or 42%) on the monthly amount for your vehicle. Making electric cars much more affordable than leasing.

    At Tusker, this figure is deducted directly from your salary and also covers insurance, road breakdown cover, maintenance and servicing, replacement tyres and a range of other motoring services. With no deposit, super-affordable single monthly amounts and low running costs, electric cars are well within reach.

    Take a look at our range of affordable electric cars by logging in and creating your account.

     

    Call us: 0333 400 2020

    If you would like help placing an order or you are an existing driver.